Garden statue addiction

This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  shirleym 3 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #10600
     sunnyedm 
    Participant

    Anyone else addicted to also decorating with garden statues? Every year I seem to pick up a few more pieces – from small to medium size. In the winter I have started to clean and haul them all inside to a corner of our basement because I found being out even in the garage pieces were becoming too cold and brittle and one bump and smash!

    Seriously I am quite addicted, especially in my back yard gardens – it is a bit to get everything out and set up (harder the putting them away ha ha) but I love walking through my yard and seeing all the little stories with the flowers and the garden decor. And I just want more!

    Do you do any garden decor – statues, stakes, pieces or do you keep it simple?

  • #10666

    You must have an incredibly beautiful yard, to have so many garden statues! Statues are a really gorgeous way to customize the yard. Which statue is your favorite? I don’t currently have a yard yet, but hopefully when I do someday, I’ll have room for a stone water fountain! I have wanted one for a while, and they are so peaceful to have around. The large ones are a bit expensive though, so I will probably save up for one single unique piece!

  • #10671
     shirleym 
    Participant

    If I have unlimited resources and space, I would design a Japanese garden complete with the traditional moon bridge and lanterns. I love the feel of a Japanese garden and the statuary plays an important role in the overall design. Has anyone here designed a Japanese Garden for their yard?

  • #11075

    Last weekend I joined a Friends of the Garden tour of the Japanese Garden at the University of Alberta Botanic Garden in Devon. Statuary is a very important element in the Japanese garden design. The moon bridge and lanterns have significant meaning in this type of garden. Traditionally the lanterns were situated near Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples. They became a traditional element in the garden with the tea gardens. Originally they were used to light paths and water basins as tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. They were sometimes used beside ponds as a representation of lighthouses. Statuary other than buddhas and lanterns are typically not used otherwise. The deer scarer, which consists of a water basin and a bamboo spout is another variation of statuary that may be found in Japanese gardens.

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  • #11090
     gardenjane 
    Participant

    Several years ago I had a big wooden wishing well that I planted. Now I have a couple obelisks, a small Japanese lantern and a gnome lounging with a book (a gift from my husband – I don’t care for gnomes but hubby bought it and he’s reading a book so it joined the garden). I’m not sure if I go for statuary in my garden so much but I have seen some lovely Grecian ladies gracing landscapes that were quite nice. I guess it would depend on the piece and whether it was from someone special.

  • #11378
     sunnyedm 
    Participant

    A little fairy sign I made for one of my gardens – I love colour πŸ™‚ (opps sorry not sure how to turn the picture – on my computer it shows it upright)

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by  sunnyedm.
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  • #11381
     sunnyedm 
    Participant

    I also painted a couple decorative fences to put in the back of the gardens – this is one of them.

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  • #11383
     sunnyedm 
    Participant

    My guy build me a wishing well a few years back, this year with all the other yardwork under way it again did not get stained, and I placed one of my new statues in it instead of a planter. πŸ˜‰ (sorry about the pictures – maybe I should turn them wrong on the computer and then they would be right here?)

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by  sunnyedm.
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    • #11414

      Adorable! The tech team is working on this but it seems it may take time to figure out why this sometimes happens. Maybe try it turned when you attach it and we’ll see if it works in the meantime. Lol. Let me know if you do that so we can get an idea of what the issue is.

  • #11375
     sunnyedm 
    Participant

    I have had some fun painting up a couple decorative pieces for the gardens … here a shots of the two fences I made – my guy built the structure, nice and sturdy stakes attached to push into the dirt.

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  • #11812
     shirleym 
    Participant

    I wonder what everyone here does to protect their statuary over the winter? Do you cover it? Move it indoors? Move to a protected spot outside?

    Several years ago our kids presented me with a fountain for mother’s day. Over the years I’ve covered with a tarp after cleaning it up, bringing the pump indoors and filling the bowl with burlap. This year I have a new fountain cover and I filled the bowl and wrapped the fountain in burlap prior to covering. I’m just curious what measures everyone else takes. I’m in Edmonton, zone 4a.

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